User Guide

0 mins to read

Nov 22, 2022

NOTE: The term, Electric Vehicle (EV), is used in this Guide to refer to either a vehicle that plugs into an electric power source to charge and store electric energy in a vehicle battery, or to a Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle. For those that plug in, the term includes both plug-in hybrid EVs (PHEV), and battery EV (BEV). The term does not include conventional hybrids, as they do not plug into an electric power source.

! IMPORTANT: To determine which EVs receive support, visit the EV Make/Model Support Reference The Pro or ProPlus service plans are required.

NOTE: Do you have a use case/feature request for your EVs?

The Sustainability Product Management Team wants to hear from you! We work hard to improve our products and your feedback is important to us. Please contact your Reseller.

Finding and filtering EVs: powertrain and fuel type automatic groups

Starting in Fleet Management Application version 8.0, there are automatically populated built-in groups that allow you to quickly find and filter on EVs in features, reports, and exception rules.

NOTE: For a vehicle’s electric powertrain to be detected, the EV must be supported, and, in the case of a BEV or PHEV, it must have charged at least once.

Found under the Asset Information group, the Powertrain and Fuel Type group automatically classifies electric vehicles (EV) based on their unique powertrain types:

  • Electric or Hybrid Plug-in: Contains all detected Battery Electric Vehicle (BEV) and detected Plug-in Hybrid (PHEV)
  • Battery Electric Vehicle (under Electric or Hybrid Plug-in): Contains all detected fully electric Battery Electric Vehicle (BEVs)
  • Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle (under Electric or Hybrid Plug-in): Contains all detected Plug-in Hybrid (PHEV)
  • Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle: Contains all detected Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle (FCEV)

Changing automatic classifications

Assets can be manually added or removed from the groups if they are not properly displayed in their respective group.

  • If an asset is manually assigned to any of these groups, that asset will be tagged under the Manually Classified Powertrain group.
  • Once an asset is manually classified, the Manually Classified Powertrain group must be removed in order for the asset to get automatically classified again.
  • If the Manually Classified Powertrain group is removed to re-enable automatic classification, it is recommended that any existing powertrain or fuel type group for the asset is removed at the same time. An asset can be part of multiple groups if it is manually classified. However, in an automatic classification scenario, the asset may be only part of one built-in group, unless the asset is a Plug-in Hybrid vehicle.

Live Map Positions: EV charging status and EV charge %

For supported EVs, the live Map displays the current battery charge % and indicates whether the vehicle is charging, driving, or stopped.

EV charging status and charge % questions and answers

Key Questions

Answers

Know What’s Happening in Real-Time

  • Who needs to charge?
  • Who is actively charging?
  • Who has the most / least battery charge %?

Map Live Positions:

Allows you to see actively charging EVs.

Allows you to see the real-time charge % for EVs.

Which vehicle is closest to a location, and within sufficient range?

Map Live Positions — Nearest:

Allows you to see and filter EV Charge — Real-time charge % (SOC).

Views

Map and List view

The Map view allows you to see which EVs are charging, outside or inside a zone: see flashing icon.

The List view allows you to see which EVs are charging, as well as the driving charge % for each EV, updated at 1% increments. The List view also allows you to sort the vehicles by battery charge % (EV Charge Level). You can sort from highest to lowest, to help you identify which are most ready for your operations, or from lowest to highest, to help you identify which need to be prioritized for charging.

Nearest View

The Nearest View helps you find the vehicles closest to your current location, and helps you assess which vehicle has enough range for a trip based on viewing their battery charge %.

Engine measurements: using EV data diagnostics

With EV data diagnostics, Engine Measurements allows for more advanced reporting that is not supported by the reports and features outlined above.

To access Engine Measurements, select Engine & Maintenance > Engine and Device … > Measurements from the main navigation menu.

For more detailed information on EV data diagnostics and their availability, visit the Electric Vehicle Data Diagnostics User Guide.

EV exception rules

NOTE: For more on Exceptions, see Rules and Groups in the Product Guide.

Built-in exception rules

EV Low Charge

Get notified when an EV becomes at risk of not having sufficient charge to complete routes without stopping to charge, which is a high productivity loss. This rule will trigger when the electric vehicle (EV) battery charge % (State of Charge) drops below the configured value.

Important information and tips:

  • The specified Battery charge looks at the Engine Measurement Generic state of charge.
  • Setting this rule to On via the built-in rule will enable it for all vehicles reporting values for Engine Measurement Generic state of charge, which will include PHEVs, BEVS, and sometimes HEVs. If you have PHEVs and HEVs in your database, we advise that you customize this rule, and use the Publish to groups option to only apply the rule to a subset of the EVs in a Group. See Publishing Exception Rules in the Product Guide for more information.

EV Enters Charging Zone with Low Charge

When an EV returns to a lot/depot with sufficiently low charge, it is time to plug in. This rule is useful for plug-in reminders and identifying which EVs need to be prioritized for charging.

Important information and tips:

  • This builds on EV Low Charge, and is more specific to plug-in reminders.
  • The specified Battery charge looks at the Engine Measurement Generic state of charge.
  • Create Zones around areas where your EVs stop and charge. Then assign those Zones to one or more designated Zone Types, and specify them here.
  • Setting this rule to On via the built-in rule will enable it for all vehicles reporting values for Engine Measurement Generic state of charge, which will include PHEVs, BEVS, and sometimes HEVs. If you have PHEVs and HEVs in your database, we advise that you customize this rule, and use the Publish to groups option to only apply to a subset of the EVs in a Group .See the Publishing Exception Rules in the Product Guide for more information.
  • Have the plug in reminder go directly to the Driver by customizing the rule and choosing to Add driver feedback. See Driver Feedback in the Product Guide for more information.

EV Exits Charging Zone with Low Charge

This rule will trigger when EVs exit a charging zone of the specified type(s) while its battery charge is below the configured value. This is useful for identifying EVs that:

  • Leave the depot/lot at the start of their day with insufficient charge to complete their routes. This works well for cases when the EVs need a minimum charge to complete their expected route distance.
  • Leave a wider geographic safe zone, such that by leaving this larger zone with a low charge, the EV no longer may have sufficient range to return to their regular charging location.

Important Information and Tips:

  • This builds on EV Low Charge, and is more specific to notify drivers that they are at risk of not having sufficient charge to complete their routes or make it back to their usual location to charge.
  • The specified Battery charge looks at the Engine Measurement Generic state of charge.
  • Create Zones around areas where your EVs stop and charge. Then assign those Zones to one or more designated Zone Types, and specify them here.
  • Setting this to On via the built-in rule will enable it for all vehicles reporting values for Engine Measurement Generic state of charge, which will include PHEVs, BEVS, and some HEVs. If you have PHEVs and HEVs in your database, we advise that you customize this rule, and use the Publish to groups option to only apply to a subset of your EVs in a Group, such as to a BEVs group. See the Publishing Exception Rules in the Product Guide for more information.
  • Have the driver be alerted by customizing the rule and choosing to Add driver feedback. See Driver Feedback in the Product Guide for more information.

EV Done Charging

This rule will trigger when the EV battery is charged to the configured value. This is useful to indicate when the EV’s charging plug can be provided to another EV, or when it is important to know when the EV is ready for use.

Important information and tips:

  • The specified Battery charge looks at the Engine Measurement Generic state of charge. Change from the default 100% value should you have your EVs configured to end charging lower than 100%.

EV Stopped in Charging Zone and Not Charging

This rule will trigger when an Electric Vehicle (EV) stops (ignition off) in a zone that has known charging stations, and does not start charging within the configured amount of time. This is to allow for time after the vehicle stops for the vehicle to get plugged in and start charging.

For when EVs shouldn’t be plugged in, such as situations where there are more EVs than plugs, and the charge level remains sufficient to cover needs, it’s possible to enable this rule to be triggered only when the EV has a battery charge % (state of charge) less than the configured value.

This is useful for identifying:

  • Missed charging opportunities.
  • When an EV is expected to be charging and is not. This could occur when an EV is not plugged in, or is plugged into non-functioning charging infrastructure.

Custom exception rules: using EV data diagnostics

With EV data diagnostics, Exception Rules offer support for additional event-based notifications and reporting, outside of those built-in rules. The following are a few to get you started!

NOTE: For more on Exceptions, see Rules and Groups in the Product Guide.

Key Questions

Answers

PHEVs Operating on Fuel Only?

Is there a PHEV with no remaining charge and operating exclusively on fuel?

NOTE: Be aware when PHEVs are not getting charged. Your operating costs increase when PHEVs operate more on fuel than electric energy.

Exception Rule Conditions:

  • Engine Measurement — Generic state of charge: Value Under 1%.
  • More > Trip > Driving.

NOTE: If you have PHEVs and HEVs in your database, we advise that you use the Publish to groups option to only apply it to a subset of your EVs in a Group, such as leveraging the EV powertrain automatic group classifications.

Charging during Peak Rate Time?

Is there an EV charging when electricity rates are high?

NOTE: Restrict charging during peak rate periods.

Exception Rule Conditions:

  • Engine Measurement — Electric vehicle charging state: 0 = not charging / 1 = AC charging / 2 = DC charging.
  • Work hours: Allows you to define the time frame for when the vehicle is not allowed to charge on a daily basis.
  • Zone/Zone Type: Specifies the location of the EV.

Fuel and EV Energy Usage report

The Fuel and EV Energy Usage Report displays driving energy consumption from both fuel and electric energy sources. Driving energy consumption includes both propulsion and auxiliary, such as heating and cooling. Both fuel and electric energy usage are combined in this report to handle Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEV), which consume both fuel and electric energy, as well as Battery Electric Vehicles (BEV), which consume only electric energy.

EV specific questions answered

Key Questions

Answers

Performance

  • How are my EVs performing?
  • What electric range am I typically getting?
  • Is it close to the promised range?
  • How are my EVs performing in comparison to my fuel cars?
  • Electric Energy Economy: Reports on performance for BEVs.
  • Total Fuel and Electric Energy Economy: Reports on efficiency for PHEVs, and provides a comparable value in a mixed fleet.

Maximizing Use of PHEV Battery

  • Are we maximizing the battery use?
  • Are these just running on gas?

% Electric Energy of Total: Filtering on just PHEVs (see EV powertrain automatic group classifications).

Report fields — EV specific meanings

Below is a simplified list of EV-relevant fields in this report:

Field

Description

Distance

Total distance traveled on all energy sources.

Electric Energy Used

Total electric energy used during ignition on, expressed in either kilowatt hour (kWh) or watt hour (Wh). Wh is used when the Electric Energy Economy Measurement unit is set to Wh/km or Wh/mile; otherwise kWh is used.

NOTE: Energy added to the battery from all non-charging sources — regenerative braking, driving down a hill, fuel engine charging in a hybrid — is subtracted from Electric Energy Used. If energy is added to the battery faster than it is consumed, the value will be negative.

Fuel Economy

This is displayed when the vehicle travels exclusively on fuel (electric energy used = 0); otherwise the field remains blank.

Electric Energy Economy

This is Electric Energy Used divided by Distance. This is displayed when the vehicle travels exclusively on electric energy (fuel used = 0); otherwise the field remains blank. It is a primary indicator of vehicle electric energy efficiency and performance.

NOTE: See Electric Energy Economy Measurement to change the measurement unit.

Similar to Electric Energy Used, if energy is added to the battery faster than it is consumed, the value will be negative.

Total Fuel and Electric Energy Economy

This is a single comparable value across all your vehicles and displayed for every vehicle. If electric energy is used, it is converted to the equivalent in fuel. This converted value is then added to the Fuel Used to calculate this combined Economy value. If electric energy is not used, this value is the same as Fuel Economy.

Units = The equivalent of the selected fuel economy measurement. To learn how we convert electric energy to fuel, please refer to the note below.

NOTE: Similar to Electric Energy Used, if energy is added to the battery faster than it is consumed, the value will be negative.

% Electric Energy of Total

Calculation of electric energy used (%), based on all electric and fuel energy usage. To learn how we convert electric energy to fuel, please refer to the note below.

NOTE: When Electric Energy Used is negative, this value may exceed 100%.

How do we convert electric energy to the equivalent in fuel?

Both electricity and fuel are forms of energy. This report performs a conversion of electric energy to the equivalent in fuel to calculate the Total Fuel and Electric Energy Economy, and the % of Electric Energy of Total. For Battery Electric Vehicles (BEV), the equivalent in gasoline fuel is converted. For PHEV, the units convert to the same fuel type that’s used by the vehicle when the fuel type is reliably available.

The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the United States Department of Transportation (DOT) have adopted the standard conversion and states that 1 US Gallon of Gasoline is equivalent to 33.7 kWh of electric energy. Additionally, the United States Department of Energy Alternative Fuels Data Center defines 1 US Gallon of Diesel as having 113% of the energy of 1 US Gallon of Gasoline.

Using these baseline conversions, including standard volume conversions to Liters and Imperial Gallons, we can convert electric energy to the equivalent in fuel.

Electric energy economy measurement

Similar to Fuel Economy Measurement, the Electric Energy Economy Measurement allows users to display measurements in the desired units.

To change the measurement unit, follow the steps below:

1

In the Fleet Management Application, click the username in the top right corner of the screen and select Options.

2

Under the Main Settings tab, choose the desired measurement unit located next to Electric Energy Economy Measurement.

3

Click Save.

NOTE: The “-e” attached to L and MPG indicates that the unit converts electric energy to the equivalent in either liters or gallons of fuel. For BEVs, electric energy is converted into the equivalent in gasoline. For PHEVs, electric energy is converted into the same fuel type used by the vehicle as detected by the Telematics Device. The conversion requires the Telematics Device to accurately detect the fuel type, otherwise, the electric energy is converted to the fuel equivalent in gasoline.

Electric energy economy measurement: metric

Unit

Description

km/kWh

For a primarily EV fleet, this helps you understand how much distance you can cover based on the battery energy — measured in kWh.

L-e/100 km

The best choice for a primarily non-EV fleet when the preferred fuel economy measurement is L/100 km.

NOTE: This converts electric energy into the fuel equivalent (in liters) to present a value in familiar units. For BEVs, electric energy is converted into the equivalent in gasoline. For PHEVs, electric energy is converted into the same fuel type used by the vehicle — detected by the Telematics Device. The conversion requires the Telematics Device to accurately detect the fuel type; otherwise, the electric energy is converted to the fuel equivalent in gasoline.

km/L-e

The best choice for a primarily non-EV fleet when the preferred fuel economy measurement is km/L.

NOTE: This converts electric energy into the fuel equivalent (in liters) to present a value in familiar units. For BEVs, electric energy is converted into the equivalent in gasoline. For PHEVs, electric energy is converted into the same fuel type used by the vehicle — detected by the Telematics Device. The conversion requires the Telematics Device to accurately detect the fuel type; otherwise, the electric energy is converted to the fuel equivalent in gasoline.

kWh/100 km

Wh/km

kWh/km

For a primarily EV fleet, this helps you understand how much energy is used / needed for a specified distance.

Electric Energy Economy Measurement: US/Imperial

Unit

Description

mi/kWh

For a primarily EV fleet, this helps you understand how much distance you can cover based on the battery energy — measured in kWh.

MPG-e (US)

MPG-e (Imp)

The best choice for a primarily non-EV fleet when the preferred fuel economy measurement is MPG.

NOTE: This converts electric energy into gallons equivalent of fuel to present a value in familiar units. For BEVs, electric energy is converted into the equivalent in gasoline. For PHEVs, electric energy is converted into the same fuel type used by the vehicle — detected by the Telematics Device. The conversion requires the Telematics Device to accurately detect the fuel type; otherwise, the electric energy is converted to the fuel equivalent in gasoline.

kWh/100 miles

Wh/mi

kWh/mile

For a primarily EV fleet, this helps you understand how much energy is used / needed for a specified distance.

NOTE: Electric Energy Economy is currently based on distance. In some cases, EVs operate in a stationary position for long periods of time, and idle. In these cases, it’s better to calculate Electric Energy Economy over time rather than distance, such as kWh/hour. Use the Electric Energy Used value and report time period to calculate this value.

Report views

List

The Fuel and EV Energy Usage page displays the electric energy and fuel usage by vehicle. Similar to Fuel used, the value for Electric Energy used is displayed under the corresponding vehicle. The list view also displays Total Fuel and Electric Energy Economy for each vehicle, as described in Report Fields — EV Specific Meanings. When both fuel and EV energy are used, clicking on a row gives you the choice to either view the Fill-Ups or EV Charging Report.

Report

Includes all fields listed in Report Fields — EV Specific Meanings, except for % Electric Energy of Total.

Advanced

Includes all fields listed in Report Fields — EV Specific Meanings.

EV Charging report

The EV Charging Report is the EV equivalent of the Fill-Ups Report used for fuel. This report provides information about the electric power and energy consumed when vehicles plug in to charge.

What’s the difference between electric power and electric energy?

Power, expressed in kilowatts (kW) or watts (W), is the rate at which electric energy is transferred into the vehicle for charging. The lower the power value, the longer the vehicle takes to charge.

Energy, expressed in kilowatt hours (kWh) or watt hours (Wh), is the total volume of power transferred or used over an hour.

EV charging report questions answered

Key Questions

Answers

Have the Full Charging History

  • What happened?
  • Where, when, for how long, and how much did EVs charge?
  • Why do my EVs have the battery charge % that they have?

Answered generally by EV Charging.

EVs and Building Load

  • What is the EV contribution to facility load?

Sum total Energy Added by Zone.

✱ NOTE: Trying to calculate charging costs and demand charge/peak charges?

Two solutions are available:

  • EV Charging Cost Report: Easily calculate charging costs, factoring in different energy prices in different locations; it does not factor in different prices by time of day (works well when you have single price).
  • EV Charging Cost Add-In: Easily calculate charging costs, factoring in different energy prices in different locations, and different prices by different times of day.

For more information, contact your Reseller.

Report fields

! IMPORTANT: The report fields are populated differently for the following sections in the List, Report, and Advanced report views: start and end dates, duration, and the start and end battery charge %.

Charge Event Report Tab of Report & Advanced

A Charge Event is recorded from when charging starts (power > 0 W) to when it stops (power = 0 W). During a single stop, there may be multiple Charge Events, if a managed charging, power sharing technology, or manual plug sharing is employed. In this report, each row of data corresponds to a single Charge Event.

Charge Session List and Summary Tab of Report & Advanced

A Charge Session groups all Charge Events that occur during a single stop. In this report, each row of data corresponds to a single Charge Session. This is intended as a more readable format — especially when managed charging, power sharing or plug sharing is employed.

Field

Description

Start Date

In the Report and Advanced Report tab, this is the date and start time of the Charge event.

In the List, and Report & Advanced Summary tab, this is the date and start time of the Charge Session — the start of the first charge event during a single stop.

End Date

In the Report and Advanced Report tab, this is the date and end time of the Charge Event.

In the List, and Report & Advanced Summary tab, this is the date and end time of the Charge Session — the end of last charge event during a single stop.

Odometer

The vehicle’s odometer at the charging time.

Location

The street address of the charging location. When Personal Mode is applied, this will be blank.

Zones

If the location is within one or more Zone, the names of the Zones are displayed. When Personal Mode is applied, this will be blank.

Zone Types

If any Zone has one or more Type, the name of each Zone Type is displayed. When Personal Mode is applied, this will be blank.

Start Charge %

In the Report and Advanced Report tab, this is the battery charge % remaining at the start of the Charge Event.

In the List, and Report & Advanced Summary tab, this is the battery charge % remaining at the start of the Charge Session — the start of the first charge event during a single stop.

End Charge %

In the Report and Advanced Report tab, this is the battery charge % remaining at the end of the Charge Event.

In the List, and Report & Advanced Summary tab, this is the battery charge % remaining at the end of the Charge Session — the end of the last charge event during a single stop.

Energy Added

The total electric energy added, expressed in either kilowatt-hour (kWh) or watt hour (Wh).

Wh is used when Electric Energy Economy Measurement unit is chosen as Wh/km or Wh/mile; otherwise kWh is used.

Max Power

During a Charge Event or Charge Session, the power typically fluctuates. The maximum value is the best indicator of the sustained power found throughout. The maximum value is also the best indicator of the EV contribution to additional billing charges resulting from excessive power demand, and for being aware of the capacity requirements for EV charging.

Wh is used when Electric Energy Economy Measurement unit is chosen as Wh/km or Wh/mile; otherwise kWh is used.

Current

This is either AC (Alternating Current) or DC (Direct Current). If you want both at once, check out the band by that name, AC/DC.

AC Voltage

The Alternating Current voltage.

Electric Energy Economy

The equivalent concept to Fuel Economy in the Fill-Ups Report. This is the amount of energy consumed over the total distance traveled since the end of the previous Charge Event / Charge Session to this one. See Electric Energy Economy Measurement to change the measurement unit.

This is not populated for PHEVs if fuel was consumed within the report’s time period.

✱ NOTE: For those in North America who want to display charging as SAE Level 1 (120 V AC), SAE Level 2 (~240 V AC), or SAE Level 3 (DC), use the Current and AC Voltage values to extend the report.

Report views

List

The List view displays the following information:

  • Zone(s)
  • Start and end date of the charging session
  • Duration of the charging session
  • Location of the charging session
  • Battery charge % from the start and end of the trip
  • Electric Energy Economy since the last charging session
  • Electric Energy Added

The

icon allows you to view the charging location, within Trips History.

✱ NOTE: Our priority is to provide high accuracy data on all EV makes and models. However, data for some vehicles may be missing or originate from a secondary source, when a primary higher quality source was not available. For these vehicles, the List Limited indicator describes the missing data and specifies if data is obtained from a secondary source, which may result in lower accuracy.

Report

The Report view includes all the fields listed in Report fields, except for Current and AC Voltage.

Advanced

The Advanced view includes all fields listed in Report fields, as well as the Charging Summary by Vehicle and Charging Summary by Zone summarized data reports.

EV Battery Health Beta report

! IMPORTANT: This feature is not to be used for real-time data applications such as coordinating just-in-time deliveries or emergency operations.

Overview

EV Battery State of Health is a new report that calculates and displays the change in usable stored energy capacity over the lifetime of your Battery Electric Vehicles (BEVs) and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEVs), for the EV’s high voltage (HV) battery. It is available in Beta as of Fleet Management Application version 8.0.

NOTE: Usable capacity versus actual capacity: Usable energy (kWh) capacity is that which the vehicle makes accessible for storage and vehicle operations, which may be different from what is physically available (actual).

EV HV batteries degrade over time and under different conditions. The health of the battery over time is a new unknown impacting lifecycle projections, range and residual value. Use this report to gain visibility on the health of your EV battery.

The current methodology uses historic data communicated by the vehicle to detect original usable energy capacity and current energy capacity. In the future, we will explore communicating values directly from the EV’s manufacturer / BMS (Battery Management System), which are not commonly reported in a standardized way.

! IMPORTANT: To determine which EVs receive support, visit the EV Make/Model Support Reference. The Pro or ProPlus service plans are required.

Enabling Feature Preview

The EV Battery Health Beta Report is in Beta and not currently enabled by default. To access this feature, you must enable Feature Preview. See Feature Preview in the Product Guide for more information.

EV Battery Health Report questions answered

Key Questions

Answers

How healthy are my EV (high voltage (HV)) batteries today, across all my EVs?

Run the EV Battery Health report, for the most recent month, and view health %, which are a function of current detected capacity compared to original detected capacity.

  • How quickly are my EV batteries degrading?
  • How quickly am I losing usable (stored energy) capacity loss?

Run the EV Battery Health, for the time period ‘Forever’ (which starts January 1, 2021) and see at a glance month over month usable capacity changes per vehicle.

How does it work?

Usable original capacity

Original usable capacity is the detected capacity of the battery when the EV was first manufactured. It’s used as the comparison point for health. Battery capacity is detected monthly using a 90-day rolling average, and these detected battery capacities are compared to original capacity. The current methodology uses historic data communicated by the vehicle to detect original usable energy capacity.

NOTE: Usable capacity versus actual capacity: Usable energy (kWh) capacity is that which the vehicle makes accessible for storage and vehicle operations, which may be different from what is physically available (actual).

For accuracy and consistency, this is crowdsourced from the make, model, year, and trim of EVs across the Fleet Management Application customer base, when VIN decoding is available. These capacity values are compared with a single original capacity value for all EVs of the same make, model, year, and trim.

To accurately detect the original capacity, input data is collected over approximately the first year of an EV’s life, from a set of the same make, model, year, and trim. Original capacity values will change month to month during the first year of an EV’s life as they become more accurate. The most recent and accurate values replace previously reported original capacity values for consistency and accuracy. For more information, see Why are the original capacity values in the report changing month over month?

Usable detected capacity

A 90-day rolling average is used monthly to detect the battery’s usable capacity. The current methodology uses historic data communicated by the vehicle to detect usable energy capacity.

NOTE: Usable capacity versus actual capacity: Usable energy (kWh) capacity is that which the vehicle makes accessible for storage and vehicle operations, which may be different from what is physically available (actual).

Regular checks on usable capacity is the key to calculating changing health, in comparison to usable original capacity, and seeing capacity changes over time. Detected battery capacities are used in the EV battery health ratio compared to usable original capacity.

EV battery health

From here, EV battery health is simply a calculation:

Report fields

NOTE: Results are no earlier than January 1, 2021 and are generated on the first of each month.

Vehicle information, capacity detection date, and odometer

Field

Description

Asset

The Asset to which the battery health detection applies.

Make

The vehicle’s make, as decoded from the vehicle’s VIN.

If the VIN was not detected accurately, or VIN decoding is pending, then this will be blank. User-contributed VINs via the Fleet Management Application are not used.

Model

The vehicle’s model, as decoded from the vehicle’s VIN.

If the VIN was not detected accurately, or VIN decoding is pending, then this will be blank. User-contributed VINs via the Fleet Management Application are not used.

Year

The vehicle’s model year, as decoded from the vehicle’s VIN.

If the VIN was not detected accurately, or VIN decoding is pending, then this will be blank. User-contributed VINs via the Fleet Management Application are not used. Additionally, for some VIN formats, year is not communicated in a standardized way and would therefore not be available.

EV Type

Indicates whether the EV is a Battery Electric Vehicle (BEV) or a Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV).

Detection Date

The date and time of the Detected usable capacity determination. This is done monthly, on the first day of the month. On the detectionDate, it represents a 90-day rolling average (see 90 Day Rolling Average Data Collection Start Date and 90 Day Rolling Average Data Collection End Date). If there is insufficient data to make an accurate detection, there are no results for that vehicle and month.

90 Day Rolling Average Data Collection Start Date

The date and time of the start of the 90 day rolling average window, relative to Detection Date, from which data is drawn towards a Detected usable capacity determination. This date is that of the first vehicle-reported data point in the dataset used towards the capacity determination.

90 Day Rolling Average Data Collection End Date

The date and time of the end of the 90-day rolling average window, relative to Detection Date, from which data is drawn towards a Detected usable capacity determination. This date is that of the last vehicle-reported data point in the dataset used towards the capacity determination.

Odometer on Detection Date

The vehicle’s odometer (km) on Detection Date.

Usable detected capacity

Monthly, a 90-day rolling average is used to detect the battery’s usable capacity. The current methodology uses historic data communicated by the vehicle to detect usable energy capacity.

NOTE: Usable capacity versus actual capacity: Usable energy (kWh) capacity is that which the vehicle makes accessible for storage and vehicle operations, which may be different from what is physically available (actual).

Regular checks on usable capacity is the key to calculating changing health, in comparison to original usable capacity, and seeing capacity changes over time. Detected battery capacities are used in the EV battery health ratio compared to original capacity.

Field

Description

Usable detected capacity

The usable detected capacity (kWh) is a 90-day rolling average. The single simplest value to use for usable battery capacity.

This value is the mean of a normal distribution, and has associated 90% confidence intervals. See Usable detected capacity 90% Confidence Interval (+/-), Usable detected capacity Lower 90% Confidence Interval, and Usable detected capacity Upper 90% Confidence Interval.

Do you see a usable detected capacity value greater than Original usable capacity? See Why do I see detected capacity values greater than original capacity values?

Usable detected capacity—advanced detail: confidence intervals

Field

Description

Usable detected capacity 90% Confidence Interval (+/-)

The usable detected capacity 90% confidence interval in kWh, relative to the mean of the normal distribution, Usable detected capacity.

The lower boundary of the 90% confidence interval would therefore be Usable detected capacity minus this value. The upper boundary of the 90% confidence interval would therefore be Usable detected capacity plus this value.

You can interpret this as 90% of the time, the usable detected capacity will be Usable detected capacity +/- this value.

Usable detected capacity Lower 90% Confidence Interval

Calculated value for the lower usable detected capacity 90% confidence interval in kWh. This is Usable detected capacity minus Usable detected capacity 90% Confidence Interval (+/-).

You can interpret this as 90% of the time, the usable detected capacity will be within this value (Usable detected capacity Lower 90% Confidence Interval) and Usable detected capacity Upper 90% Confidence Interval.

Usable detected capacity Upper 90% Confidence Interval

Calculated value for the upper usable detected capacity 90% confidence interval in kWh. This is Usable detected capacity plus Usable detected capacity 90% Confidence Interval (+/-).

You can interpret this as 90% of the time, the usable detected capacity will be within Usable detected capacity Lower 90% Confidence Interval and this value (Usable detected capacity Upper 90% Confidence Interval).

Original usable capacity

Original usable capacity is the detected capacity of the battery when the EV was first manufactured. It’s used as the comparison point for health. Battery capacity is detected monthly using a 90-day rolling average, and these detected battery capacities are compared to original capacity. The current methodology uses historic data communicated by the vehicle to detect original usable energy capacity.

NOTE: Usable capacity versus actual capacity: Usable energy (kWh) capacity is that which the vehicle makes accessible for storage and vehicle operations, which may be different from what is physically available (actual).

For accuracy and consistency, this is crowdsourced from the make, model, year, and trim of EVs across the Fleet Management Application customer base, when VIN decoding is available. These capacity values are compared with a single original capacity value for all EVs of the same make, model, year, and trim.

To accurately detect the original capacity, input data is collected over approximately the first year of an EV’s life, from a set of the same make, model, year, and trim. Original capacity values will change month to month during the first year of an EV’s life as they become more accurate. The most recent and accurate values replace previously reported original capacity values for consistency and accuracy. For more information, see Why are the original capacity values in the report changing month over month?

Field

Description

Usable original capacity

The usable original capacity (kWh) is the usable detected capacity when this EV was new. This is consistent across all make, model, year, when available via VIN decoding, and trim EVs. This value is the mean of a normal distribution, and has associated 90% confidence intervals. See Usable original capacity 90% Confidence Interval (+/-), Usable original capacity Lower 90% Confidence Interval, and Usable original capacity Upper 90% Confidence Interval).

Original usable capacity—advanced detail: confidence intervals

Field

Description

Usable original capacity 90% Confidence Interval (+/-)

The usable original capacity 90% confidence interval in kWh, relative to the mean of the normal distribution, Usable original capacity.

The lower boundary of the 90% confidence interval would therefore be Usable original capacity minus this value. The upper boundary of the 90% confidence interval would therefore be Usable original capacity plus this value.

You can interpret this as 90% of the time, the usable original capacity will be Usable original capacity +/- this value.

Usable original capacity Lower 90% Confidence Interval

Calculated value for the lower usable original capacity 90% confidence interval in kWh. This is Usable original capacity minus Usable original capacity 90% Confidence Interval (+/-).

You can interpret this as 90% of the time, the usable original capacity will be within this value (Usable original capacity Lower 90% Confidence Interval) and Usable original capacity Upper 90% Confidence Interval.

Usable original capacity Upper 90% Confidence Interval

Calculated value for the upper usable original capacity 90% confidence interval in kWh. This is Usable original capacity plus Usable original capacity 90% Confidence Interval (+/-).

You can interpret this as 90% of the time, the usable original capacity will be within Usable original capacity Lower 90% Confidence Interval and this value (Usable original capacity Upper 90% Confidence Interval).

EV battery health

Field

Description

EV Battery Health

The battery’s detected health, displayed as a percentage. This is usable detected capacity (Usable detected capacity), a mean of a normal distribution, as a % of usable original detected capacity (Usable original capacity), also a mean of a normal distribution.

In some cases, especially near the start of vehicle life, the usable detected capacity (Usable detected capacity) may exceed usable original detected capacity (Usable original capacity). For an explanation, see

Why do I see detected capacity values greater than original capacity values?

In these cases, we cap this value (EV Battery Health), EV Battery Health Lower 90% Confidence Interval (-), and EV Battery Health Upper 90% Confidence Interval (+) at 100% to indicate that the battery health is the best it can be.

EV battery health—advanced detail: confidence intervals

Field

Description

EV Battery Health Lower 90% Confidence Interval (-)

The battery health’s lower 90% confidence interval as a percentage, relative to EV Battery Health.

EV Battery Health is the ratio of 2 means of normal distributions: Usable detected capacity and Usable original capacity. Therefore, we also seek to provide the lower (this value) and upper bound (see EV Battery Health Upper 90% Confidence Interval (+)) of the 90% confidence interval.

You can interpret this as 90% of the time, the EV’s battery health will be within EV Battery Health Lower 90% Confidence Interval (-) (this value) and EV Battery Health Upper 90% Confidence Interval (+).

In some cases, especially near the start of vehicle life, the usable detected capacity (Usable detected capacity) may exceed usable original detected capacity (Usable original capacity). For an explanation, see

Why do I see detected capacity values greater than original capacity values?

In these cases, we cap EV Battery Health, this value (EV Battery Health Lower 90% Confidence Interval (-)), and EV Battery Health Upper 90% Confidence Interval (+) at 100% to indicate that the battery health is the best it can be.

EV Battery Health Upper 90% Confidence Interval (+)

The battery health’s upper 90% confidence interval as a %, relative to EV Battery Health.

EV Battery Health is the ratio of 2 means of normal distributions: Usable detected capacity and Usable original capacity. Therefore, we also seek to provide the lower (see EV Battery Health Lower 90% Confidence Interval (-) and upper bound (this value) of the 90% confidence interval.

You can interpret this as 90% of the time, the EV’s battery health will be within EV Battery Health Lower 90% Confidence Interval (-) and EV Battery Health Upper 90% Confidence Interval (+) (this value).

In some cases, especially near the start of vehicle life, the usable detected capacity (Usable detected capacity) may exceed usable original detected capacity (Usable original capacity). For an explanation, see

Why do I see detected capacity values greater than original capacity values?

In these cases, we cap EV Battery Health, EV Battery Health Lower 90% Confidence Interval (-), and this value (EV Battery Health Upper 90% Confidence Interval (+)) at 100% to indicate that the battery health is the best it can be.

Data source information

Field

Description

Usable detected capacity Source

For traceability reasons, we provide the source of the data communicated through this report. In the currently available version, the only supported source is that from the Fleet Management Application, hence the value is shown as ‘Fleet Management Application calculated’.

Usable original capacity Source

For traceability reasons, we provide the source of the data communicated through this report.

In the currently available version, the only supported source is that from the Fleet Management Application. There are two different values presented:

  • 0: Fleet Management Application calculated; this vehicle's data included in calculation.
  • 1: Fleet Management Application calculated, based on other make, model, and year vehicle data. This vehicle's data is not included.

FAQ

Why are some of my vehicles showing no results at all, or no results for some time periods?

Here are a few possible reasons:

  • Only EVs (BEVs and PHEVs) that are supported will communicate results. See all supported EVs and make a request via your Partner for missing support.
  • Ensure EVs are driven and charged regularly for the 90-day period prior to each detection date. Monthly usable capacity detections are made using several input sources that the EVs communicate over the previous 90 days from regular use. We only supply a monthly detection should there be enough input data to provide an accurate detection.
  • Battery health detections started January 1, 2021.

Why are there missing values?

Applies to:

The root cause for all missing values is missing usable original capacity values, which are currently auto-detected from EVs. The auto-detection process depends on a number of factors:

  • VIN is fully detected. Today, VINs contributed via the Fleet Management Application are not used.
  • VIN is fully decoded into a make, model, and year, when available via VIN decoding.
  • Across all EVs in the Fleet Management Application customer base of the same make, model, year, when available via VIN decoding, and trim, insufficient data is collected at the start of vehicle life to make an accurate auto-detection.

Why are the original capacity values in the report changing month over month?

To accurately detect the original capacity, input data is used from a set of the same make, model, year and trim EVs, when it is available via VIN decoding. The data is collected over approximately the first year of the vehicle’s use. Month over month during that year period, original capacity can therefore change and updated for improved accuracy.

Why do I see detected capacity values greater than original capacity values?

To provide a highly accurate determination of the original capacity of a given EV, data to determine the original capacity is collected from a sufficiently large sample of EVs sharing the same make, model, year, when available via VIN decoding, and trim. The sample is then averaged, with a 90% confidence interval available. Since original capacity is an average (mean), there will be cases, especially in the early life of an EV, whereby the detected capacity can be higher than the make, model, year, when available via VIN decoding, and trim original capacity determination. For these cases, we cap the EV battery health calculation at 100% to indicate that battery health is detected as the best it can be.

scroll-up